Matthieu Ricard Biography
Biography, Blog, Tibet House Switzerland

Matthieu Ricard Biography

Matthieu Ricard has lived in the Himalayan region for the last thirty-five years. Born in France in 1946, he grew up among the personalities and ideas of Paris’ intellectual and artistic circles. He studied classical music, ornithology and photography and worked for his Ph-D degree in molecular genetics at the Institute Pasteur under the Nobel Laureate Francois Jacob. Learn more about Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region.

After completing his doctoral thesis in 1972, he decided to forsake his scientific career and concentrate on Tibetan Buddhist contemplative practice. Since then, he has lived in India, Bhutan and Nepal with the greatest living teachers of that tradition and became the disciple and attendant of Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (one of the most eminent Tibetan masters of our times). Matthieu is a Buddhist monk and, since 1989, he has acted as the French interpreter for His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

He is the author of several best selling books including The Monk and the Philosopher (Schocken, 1999), a book of dialogues with his father, the French philosopher Jean-François Revel, which has been translated into twenty-one languages; The Quantum and the Lotus (Crown, 2002) a dialogue with the astrophysicist Trinh Xuan Thuan and, recently, Happiness, A Guide to Developing Life’s Most Important Skill (Little, Brown and Co, New York; Atlantic Press, London). When he was twenty, he wrote the widely read book Animal Migrations (Hill and Wang, 1969).

Matthieu Ricard Biography

For the nearly four decades, he has been photographing the spiritual masters, the landscapes and the people of the Himalayas and has published several albums including Buddhist Himalayas (Harry Abrams, 2002), Journey to Enlightenment (Aperture, 1996 – The Spirit of Tibet in paperback, Aperture 2001), Monk Dancers of Tibet (Shambhala, 2003), Tibet (Thames and Hudson, 2006) and Motionless Journey (Thames and Hudson, 2007). Henri Cartier-Bresson has said of his work, “Matthieu’s spiritual life and his camera are one, from which springs these images, fleeting and eternal.”

A board member of the Mind and Life Institute, which is devoted to meetings and collaborative research between scientists and Buddhist scholars and meditators, his contributions have appeared in Working with Destructive Emotions (edited by Daniel Goleman) The Dalai Lama at M.I.T (edited by A. Harrington and A. Zajonc), Train Your Mind, Change your Brain (Sharon Begley) and other books of essays.

He is engaged in the research on the effect of mind training and meditation on the brain, at Madison-Wisconsin, Princeton, Harvard, and Berkeley Universities and is the co-author of a ground breaking scientific paper published by the PNAS (Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, in the USA in September 2004). He holds regular meetings with neuroscientists, psychologists (positive psychology) and therapists (cognitive therapy). He is particularly interested in promoting the concept of Gross National Happiness.

He also translated several books from Tibetan into English and French, including – The Life of Shabkar, The Autobiography of a Tibetan Yogin (Snow Lion), The Heart Treasure of the Enlightened Ones (Shambhala Publication), One Hundred Verses of Advice (Shambhala) and The Heart of Compassion (Shambhala). He was the cinematographer and scriptwriter for the video, The Spirit of Tibet, National Film Board of Canada.

Financial Contributions
Blog, Donation, Tibet House Switzerland

Financial Contributions

Tibet House Switzerland Foundation is a non-profit organization. You can participate in our Foundation by making a donation and if possible by offering some of your time and skills. We are grateful for the financial contributions and donations of works of art, which are of great value to us, as they allow us to continue to carry out our cultural and humanitarian work.

Financial Contributions

For those who wish to receive more information about the various projects we are curating, we are pleased to be available: contact us at the addresses indicated in these pages, where you will find all the information on the Foundation and on Snow Lion Club and on the various international events, such as pure concerts, seminars and conferences in the review

Tibet House Switzerland Foundation
Biography, Blog, Tibet House Switzerland

Tibet House Switzerland Foundation

Tibet House Switzerland Foundation is a non-profit foundation whose purpose is to support the recognition of Tibetan culture in every respect and preserve its artistic and religious heritage by preserving, protecting and collecting any traditional Tibetan art and culture.

Snow Lion Club

is an association of supporters of the Tibet House Switzerland Foundation that gives all interested people who share the goals of the Foundation to actively participate in it for the realization of its great ideals.

Tibet House Switzerland Foundation

Project

In Switzerland lives the most important Tibetan community in exile in the West, with over 2,500 residents. Our foundation intends to carry out some important projects, among which the creation of a permanent museum in Lugano in which to preserve and present to the public a part of the remarkable artistic and traditional heritage of the Tibetan people and the establishment of an international study center stands out. on tolerance and non-violence. Click here to get further about Monks from Tibet.

PRESENTATION
Blog, Development Projects, Tibet House Switzerland

PRESENTATION

On December 7, 2007 at a private audience with THSF in Milan, His Holiness the Dalai Lama thanked our foundation and Ticino for the humanitarian work supported in the past, and made a specific appeal for THSF to continue to support the urgent aid needed for the Tibetan refugee camps in India and throughout the Himalayan region. These refugee camps, originally intended as temporary settlements to house the millions of Tibetans fleeing Tibet, have since the 1960s become permanent colonies often housing two or three generations of Tibetans. The Indian Government has a list of SOS appeals to help a number of these settlements, and THSF chooses one project every year to underwrite. Last year, we successfully raised funds to build water pipes in the Tibetan settlement of Bhandara.This year our fund-raising appeal is to help build flood protection for the AGLING SETTLEMENT in Ladakh, India. We have committed to raise CHF 58,000 (INR 1,993,941) during 2008 in order to build protection from the devastation brought by monsoon floods that will save lives and prevent major destruction to this village of Tibetan refugees.

ABOUT THE AGLING PROJECT:

Project Title: 

Construction of Flood Protection Bund at Agling

Project Location: 

Sonamling Tibetan Settlement, Leh, Ladakh

Project Holder: 

Office of the Chief Representative Sonamling Tibetan Settlement P.O. Chohlamsar – 194104Leh, Ladakh, Jammu & Kashmir State

Project Duration: 

One YearProject Budget: Rs. 4,193,941.00Secured Fund: Rs. 2,200,000.00Fund Requested: Rs. 1,993,941.00 = approx. CHF 58,000 Background Agling Tibetan settlement in Ladakh was established in early 70’s and is the home to a total population of about 2,000 people. Their main occupation are cultivation and hard-labor jobs. The settlement camps are located about 9 Kms from the settlement office, Choglamsar, and 5 Kms from the town of Leh, and are situated at the height about 11000 ft. above sea level. The main crops of the location are wheat, barley, peas, oats, etc. 90% of the total population are poor and living under poverty line due to low agricultural yield and have no major other sources of income. The people are allotted a few acres of land for their livelihood, but due to the aridity of the soil, scarcity, poor irrigation facilities and harsh climatic conditions, they cannot subsist on cultivation only and have been forced to work on casual labor on road and building construction in nearby military units to supplement their family income.

The housing, sanitation facilities, power and water supplies are inadequate to maintain the basic health of the people. The meagre agriculture produce cannot meet the demand for both animals and human consumption. The flood from Leh Gangla River is also becoming a high risk for these people. Objectives- To erect permanent concrete structure flood protection bund from the mainstream of Gangla river.- To provide livelihood security of the people of Agling camp.-To control flood from Leh Gangla river. RationaleUnprecedented floods occurred in some of the Tibetan camps in Agling due to overflow of Leh Gangla river on August 2, 2006. The worst affected areas were Agling camps no. 8 & 9, where about 56 acres of standing crops, plantation, cow sheds, boundary walls and other agriculture land sites were washed away. In addition, the existing main irrigation canal between camps no. 8 and 9 was completely cut and now there are no sources of irrigation water for the agriculture land. The problems of this flood have also been experienced in year 2005 with equally heavy losses for the residents of the Agling settlement. This widespread destruction was reported to the District Administration Authorities for necessary consideration for re-construction of damaged canal and compensation for loss of crops, but so far they have not taken any solid action.The floods from Leh Gangla river are now becoming a regular phenomenon and there is every chance that they might cause unthinkable heavy damages to the life and property of the residents of the Agling settlement in future too, until and unless some very strong measures to control such flood without which the livelihood and survival of the residents are very difficult and threatened.

Project Holder: 

Office of the Chief Representative Sonamling Tibetan Settlement P.O. Chohlamsar – 194104 Leh, Ladakh, Jammu & Kashmir State Project Duration: One Year Project Budget: Rs. 4,193,941.00 Secured Fund: Rs. 2,200,000.00 Fund Requested: Rs. 1,993,941.00 = approx. CHF 58,000 Background Agling Tibetan settlement in Ladakh was established in early 70’s and is the home to a total population of about 2,000 people. Their main occupation are cultivation and hard-labor jobs. The settlement camps are located about 9 Kms from the settlement office, Choglamsar, and 5 Kms from the town of Leh, and are situated at the height about 11000 ft. above sea level. The main crops of the location are wheat, barley, peas, oats, etc. 90% of the total population are poor and living under poverty line due to low agricultural yield and have no major other sources of income. The people are allotted a few acres of land for their livelihood, but due to the aridity of the soil, scarcity, poor irrigation facilities and harsh climatic conditions, they cannot subsist on cultivation only and have been forced to work on casual labor on road and building construction in nearby military units to supplement their family income. The housing, sanitation facilities, power and water supplies are inadequate to maintain the basic health of the people. The meagre agriculture produce cannot meet the demand for both animals and human consumption. The flood from Leh Gangla River is also becoming a high risk for these people. Objectives- To erect permanent concrete structure flood protection bund from the mainstream of Gangla river.- To provide livelihood security of the people of Agling camp.-To control flood from Leh Gangla river. Rationale Unprecedented floods occurred in some of the Tibetan camps in Agling due to overflow of Leh Gangla river on August 2, 2006. The worst affected areas were Agling camps no. 8 & 9, where about 56 acres of standing crops, plantation, cow sheds, boundary walls and other agriculture land sites were washed away. In addition, the existing main irrigation canal between camps no. 8 and 9 was completely cut and now there are no sources of irrigation water for the agriculture land. The problems of this flood have also been experienced in year 2005 with equally heavy losses for the residents of the Agling settlement. This widespread destruction was reported to the District Administration Authorities for necessary consideration for re-construction of damaged canal and compensation for loss of crops, but so far they have not taken any solid action.The floods from Leh Gangla river are now becoming a regular phenomenon and there is every chance that they might cause unthinkable heavy damages to the life and property of the residents of the Agling settlement in future too, until and unless some very strong measures to control such flood without which the livelihood and survival of the residents are very difficult and threatened.

CENTRO CARPE DIEM VITAE
Blog, Tibet House Switzerland

CENTRO CARPE DIEM VITAE

About Lu Jong

Lu Jong is a system of physical movements developed centuries ago by Tibetan monks living in remote, cold, and extremely inaccessible places in the Himalayan region. The movements help to open the channels leading to the meridians, thus unblocking the natural energies of the body. When practiced regularly Lu Jong becomes a healthy yet simple method to maintain physical well-being. It also makes our body positively responsive to the challenges of daily stress and seasonal changes.

The last words Buddha told his disciples before dying were: Sammasati, Remember that you are a Buddha. Buddha-nature begins in treating our body as a temple and Lu Jong has long been practiced as an effective method to balance inner harmony with outer conditions. Please come and join us for this very special event! Checkout more physical yoga exercises on www.britannica.com/topic/samma-sati

CENTRO CARPE DIEM VITAE

About Loten Dahortsang

Loten Dahortsang was born in Lhasa, the capital of Tibet. In 1979 he immigrated to Nepal and began studying Buddhism in the monastery headed by Lama Yeshe. Since 1982 he has been living in the monastic community of the Tibet Institute at Rikon, on the outskirts of Zürich, where he has been educated by his uncle, Geshe Jampa Lodro, as well as by Geshe Ugyen Tseten and Geshe Gedün Sangpo. He has continued his studies in Tibetan Buddhism since 2002 at the monastic university of Sera in South India. He conducts both meditation and teaching classes and retreats in Buddhist centres throughout Europe, and was first assistant director of the documentary The Saltmen of Tibet, a New York Times Film Critics’ Pick.

Matthieu Ricard introduces the seminar as following: “We all seek some kind of happiness and a sense of fulfillment. No one wakes up in the morning thinking: May I suffer the whole day. When we engage freely in any long-term activity, we do so in the hope that it will increase our well-being or that of others. We usually look outside for the causes of happiness. Likewise, when things go wrong, we instinctively search for outer remedies and try to change the conditions to suit ourselves. This often fails as, unfortunately, our control of the outer world is limited, temporary and often illusory. In fact, it is our mind that translates outer conditions into happiness or suffering, and, even though it may not be easy to transform one’s mind, it is something that lies within the reach of our capacities.”